When somebody overrates himself, he is often warned: “Don’t be a mantis trying to stop a chariot.” The saying comes from a legend dated back to the Spring and Autumn Period.
One day, the King of Qi went out for a hunting with his men. The carriages were going along, when suddenly a mantis stood in the middle of the road with its sickle-like forelegs opened. It was obvious that he was trying to fight against the carriage to hold it back. Surprised at the case, the King of Qi ordered to stop and asked what creature it was. When he was told it was called mantis, and it would go well up to bridle decisively when it was challenged.

The King sighed with exclamation at its braveness. He mused a moment and added: “It’s a great pity that it is not more than an insect. If it were a man, he must be the bravest warrior in the world!” Then the King ordered his carriages turn around it to leave the mantis there standing martially.
When the persons around heard the King’s words, they were well touched and determined to devote themselves to the country.
As time passed, the meaning of the phrase changed to its opposite. Now it means that someone overrates oneself and try to hold back an overwhelmingly superior force.

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It is said that in antiquity a god named KuaFu determined to have a race with the Sun and catch up with Him. So he rushed in the direction of the Sun. Finally, he almost ran neck and neck with the Sun, when he was too thirsty and hot to continue. Where could he find some water? Just then the Yellow River and Wei River came into sight, roaring on. He swooped upon them earnestly and drank the whole river. But he still felt thirsty and hot, thereupon, he marched northward for the lakes in the north of China. Unfortunately, he fell down and died halfway because of thirst. With his fall, down dropped his cane. Then the cane became a stretch of peach, green and lush.
And so comes the idiom, KuaFu chased the Sun, which becomes the trope of man’s determination and volition against nature.

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an ant may well destroy a whole damn.

you can’t stop the wind but you can harness it!

mistakes in life are common and are not to be frowned upon but learned from!

(*_*)

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