Once, a visitor was being shown around a leper colony in India. The colony was built to provide a shelter for those people who were poor and had various physical disabilities. At noon a gong (a metal disk that produces a sound when hit with a hammer) sounded to gather the inhabitants for the midday meal.

People came from all parts of the compound to the dining hall. Suddenly, everyone started laughing at seeing two young men, one riding on the other’s back, pretending to be a horse and a rider. They were having lots of fun. As the visitor watched, he was told that the man who carried his friend was blind, and the man being carried was lame (who couldn’t walk). The one who couldn’t see used his feet; the one who couldn’t walk used his eyes. Together they helped each other and reached their destination.

Let us use each other’s strengths to make up for the weaknesses of others. Our strength is in unity, not in division.

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(re-post)

The Judo Master

Sometimes your biggest weakness can become your biggest strength. Take, for example, the story of one 10-year-old boy who decided to study judo despite the fact that he had lost his left arm in a devastating car accident.

The boy began lessons with an old Japanese judo master. The boy was doing well, so he couldn’t understand why, after three months of training, the master had taught him only one move.
“Sensei,” the boy finally said, “shouldn’t I be learning more moves?”
“This is the only move you know, but this is the only move you’ll ever need to know,” the sensei replied. Not quite understanding, but believing in his teacher, the boy kept training.

Several months later, the sensei took the boy to his first tournament.
Surprising himself, the boy easily won his first two matches. The third match proved to be more difficult, but after some time, his opponent became impatient and charged; the boy deftly used his one move to win the match. Still amazed by his success, the boy was now in the finals.
This time, his opponent was bigger, stronger, and more experienced. For a while, the boy appeared to be overmatched. Concerned that the boy might get hurt, the referee called a time-out. He was about to stop the match when the sensei intervened. “No,” the sensei insisted, “Let him continue.”
Soon after the match resumed, his opponent made a critical mistake: he dropped his guard. Instantly, the boy used his move to pin him. The boy had won the match and the tournament. He was the champion.

On the way home, the boy and sensei reviewed every move in each and every match. Then the boy summoned the courage to ask what was really on his mind. “Sensei, how did I win the tournament with only one move?”
“You won for two reasons,” the sensei answered. “First, you’ve almost mastered one of the most difficult throws in all of judo. Second, the only known defense for that move is for your opponent to grab your left arm.”

The boy’s biggest weakness had become his biggest strength.

No human on this planet is perfect, we all have a crack in our backside.

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As in the yin and the yang, we all have strengths and weaknesses. I have always been of small stature and is why my father placed me in martial arts at a young age. Not being big and strong I have become agile and fast. Speed over power, and this has worked for me in physical confrontations many times. But like I always say, if I can’t whip them with my mind (and we engage in a physical confrontation) then I have lost. (Then again, in my profession, it has kept me from becoming harmed thus far.) One of my favorite lines comes from The Karate Kid, (Mr. Myagi is what the inmates call me at the unit) We do not train in order to fight, but so that we do not have to.

bows (~_~) humble

 

sometimes, you don’t realize your own strengths until someone tries to take advantage of your weaknesses

(~_~)

link to strength and weakness story  zen attitude link

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