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I was introduced to The Shark and the Goldfish by my boss. He tacked a post-it to its cover that said “I think this will change your perspective on things” and left it on my desk.

My first impression wasn’t positive. The story is illustrated, so it reminded me of a children’s book. The opening statement–Are you a shark or a goldfish?–made me wonder what the heck my boss was trying to tell me. Was he suggesting that I needed to be more of a man? I didn’t get it. I skimmed the book’s contents within five minutes, decided the story was too hokey for my tastes, and dismissed it as unimportant.

Sometime later, a coworker recognized the book in my cubicle and asked me about it. After explaining why I didn’t really read it, my coworker agreed that although the story was corny, the message is what really mattered. He suggested I try reading it again, saying “Make sure you read the introduction this time.”

After reading The Shark and the Goldfish front to back, I’m happy to report that I get it now. The author Jon Gordon starts off with a confession saying that of course a goldfish, a freshwater fish, cannot survive in the ocean. Gordon goes on to explain that his “Shark or Goldfish?” concept started out as a story he liked using in motivational speeches. The story is intentionally short so he can communicate his point quickly. Consequently, The Shark and the Goldfish is more of a quick-and-dirty tool than a magnum opus:

A goldfish is alone is his bowl, perfectly content with being fed each day. During a trip to the beach he is accidentally swept away into the ocean, where he starts to go hungry. He fears that he is done for, until he meets a friendly shark who challenges his thinking.

The message shines through in this bit of dialogue between the shark and his newfound friend: “You know what your problem is?” “I’m starving and no one will feed me.” “No, you are waiting to be fed.”

The focus of the story revolves around one important truth: You can’t control the events in your life. You can, however, choose how you respond to them.

This truism is the motivation that the shark uses to teach the goldfish how to “be a shark.” In order to be a successful shark, the goldfish will need to work hard for his food. Furthermore, it’s not a “once in a while” type of work — it’s a mindset that reinforces the need to work hard every day.

It is a lesson that translates well into dealing with adversity. If you’re unemployed, you can’t wait for jobs to come knocking at your door – you must actively search for jobs and beat out the competition to a job offer. If you’re working in a dead-end job, you can’t wait for something better to land in your lap – you must actively seek out new opportunities. If you’re anxious to get a raise or a promotion, you can’t wait for someone to notice you – you must take on extra projects, leverage your contacts, and do other proactive tasks that will help get you get noticed.

Though the main focus of The Shark and the Goldfish is about turning misfortune into fortune by seeing opportunity in the midst of adversity, there are other lessons to be learned from the story. The book highlights these different lessons that the goldfish learns through illustration: Whenever the goldfish learns something, he’ll inscribe a reminder into different rocks or pieces of coral throughout the ocean. The reminder that resonated most with me is the importance of faith over fear.

Faith and fear are similar because both are beliefs of a future that hasn’t happened yet. Fear is the belief in a negative future, while faith is a belief in a positive one. Fear is most common, because of the multiple forms it comes in. There is fear of the unknown, fear of failure, fear of starving, fear of change, and even fear of fear. Because fear can be so paralyzing, it’s no wonder that so many people will settle for their small goldfish-bowl world. We are content, so long as we’re being fed.

As a result, we forget about our options for a different future. We lose sight of our own potential because our faith in a positive future is drowned out by all of the fears we carry.

In The Shark and the Goldfish, the goldfish successfully overcomes his fears. In the face of adversity, he chooses to be proactive. Despite negativity from naysayers, he proves himself to be a shark capable of finding more food than he’d ever need. He decides to create a school for fish that once thought like himself, and teaches what it takes to be a shark like him.

At about 80 pages, many of which have less than 15 words on them due to illustrations, The Shark and the Goldfish can be read in under an hour. Gordon admits that he’s received criticism regarding the length and simplicity of the book, and I almost dismissed its significance because of just how small it is.

In spite of my poor first impression, I am grateful that The Shark and the Goldfish was recommended to me a second time, because I see now what my boss was getting at. When it comes to success, attitude is everything. With a proactive approach to life, you can handle everything that’s thrown at you, even if it’s as terrifying as the vastness of the ocean to a tiny goldfish. You realize that against all odds, you are still in control over yourself. As a result, you are in control of your life.

As Gordon puts it, the choice is yours. What do you want to be? A shark or a goldfish?

Are you a shark or a goldfish

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“Finding positive ways to strive through waves of change.”

(~_~)

 

 
Fran the Frog was the best chef in the whole swamp, and all the toads and frogs of the region enjoyed coming to her very select restaurant. Her ‘Flies in spicy bug sauce’ and her ‘Caramelised dragon flies wings with honey of bee’ were the kind of delicacies that every self-respecting frog should try; and that made Fran feel truly proud.

One day, Toby came to her restaurant, ready for a nosh. Toby was a great big toad, and certainly wasn’t the brightest. When Fran’s fine creations were brought before him he complained, saying that that wasn’t food, and that what he really wanted was a botfly burger. Fran came out of the kitchen to see what the problem was, and Toby told her that these dishes weren’t good enough for – and certainly wouldn’t fill – a Smooth Newt. This made Fran so offended, and furious, that she went to the kitchen, came back with a frying pan, and whacked Toby squarely on the forehead.

A slight scuffle ensued.

Even though Fran realised she should have controlled her temper, and she kept asking Toby to forgive her, the toad was so angry that he said he could only forgive her if she handed him the frying pan so he could hit her back.
Everyone tried to calm Toby down, knowing full well that, given his strength, he could easily crack little Fran’s head open with that frying pan.

Toby would not accept an apology, and Fran felt awful for having bashed him, so she tried everything. She gave him a special cream for bruises, she poured him an exquisite puddlewater liqueur. Even better than that, she cooked him a… beautiful botfly burger!

But Toby the Toad still insisted he would not be satisfied until he got to return the blow he had received. It had reached the stage where he was almost getting out of control.

Then a very old toad entered the restaurant, shuffling along with the help of two crutches.

– Wait Toby, – said the old toad -you can give her a whack after I’ve broken your leg. Remember that you are the reason why I have to walk with these crutches.

Toby didn’t know what to say.

He recognised the old toad. It was Reddit, his old teacher. When Toby was small, Reddit had saved him from a bunch of young hooligans. In the process, Reddit had lost a leg. Toby remembered that it had all happened because he had been highly disobedient, but he had never given a thought to Reddit until now…

Toby now realised he was being very unfair to Fran. Everyone, including himself, made mistakes sometimes. And if we are to return blow for blow, wound for wound, all we are doing is prolonging the damage. So, even though his head still hurt and he thought Fran had made quite a remarkable mistake with that frying pan, seeing her feeling so sorry, and doing everything she could to put things right, Toby decided to forgive her.

Apology accepted, they spent the rest of the evening laughing at what had happened, and enjoying wonderful botfly burgers. And everyone heartily agreed that that was a rather better idea than getting into problems with pans.

story source: a frog and a frying pan

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If every one lived by the rule an eye for an eye, the whole world would be blind.

when your cup over flows with cuteness… smile!

(~_~)

A Native American and his friend were in downtown New York City, walking near Times Square in Manhattan.  It was during the noon lunch hour and the streets were filled with people.  Cars were honking their horns, taxicabs were squealing around corners, sirens were blaring, and the sounds of the city were almost deafening.

Suddenly, the Native American said, “I hear a cricket.”

His friend said, “What?  You must be crazy.  You couldn’t possibly hear a cricket in all of this noise!”

“No, I’m sure of it,” the Native American said, “I heard a cricket.”

  “That’s crazy,” said the friend.

The Native American listened carefully for a moment, and then walked across the street to a big cement planter where some shrubs were growing.  He looked into the bushes, beneath the branches, and  sure enough, he located a small cricket.  His friend was utterly amazed.

“That’s incredible,” said his friend “You must have superhuman ears!”

“No,” said the Native American.  “My ears are no different from yours. It all depends on what you’re listening for.”

“But that can’t be!” said the friend.  “I could never hear a cricket in this noise.”

“Yes, it is, it depends on what is really important to you.  Here, let me show you.”

  He reached into his pocket, pulled out a few coins, and discreetly dropped them on the sidewalk.  And then, with the noise of the crowded street still blaring in their ears, they noticed every head within twenty feet turn and look to see if the money that tinkled on the pavement was theirs.

“See what I mean?” asked the Native American.  “It all depends on what’s important to you.”

this story found here

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It’s a cold day in December in New York City. A little boy about ten years old was standing before a shoe store on Broadway, barefooted, peering through the window, and shivering with cold. A lady approached the boy and said, “My little fellow, why are you looking so earnestly in that window?” “I was asking God to give me a pair of shoes,” was the boy’s reply.

The lady took him by the hand and went into the store, and asked the clerk to get a half dozen pairs of socks for the boy. She then asked if he could give her a basin of water and a towel. He quickly brought them to her. She took the little fellow to the back part of the store and, removing her gloves, knelt down, washed his little feet, and dried them with a towel. By this time, the clerk had returned with the socks. Placing a pair upon the boy’s feet, she then purchased a pair of shoes for him, and tying up the remaining pairs of socks, gave them to him. She patted him on the head, and said, “No doubt, my little fellow, you feel more comfortable now?”

As she turned to go, the astonished lad caught her by the hand and looking into her face with tears in his eyes, he answered the question with these words: “Are you God’s wife?”

–Author Unknown

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have an incredible day

(~_~)

There were two fireflies buzzing around the woods one night. One claimed it was enlightenend because of its ability to shine in the darkness. The other was a clown/comedian, always laughing and playing, saying, “My butts on fire,” or “Lightening struck my back side.”

The two fireflies happened upon a cabin in the woods and lighted upon the front porch where an old man sat watching the clouds embrace the moon. The zen master watched as the two fireflies danced around, “Ah, two fireflies, nearly the same,” the master said. ” Except one is brighter than the other.” (But which?)

by Art~

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Out in the state of California there is a great valley known as the Yosemite Valley, and here once lived a tribe of Indians who tried to explain how the wonderful streams and trees and rocks came to be.

The story of one of the highest peaks, El Capitan, is very interesting. One day some Indian boys went fishing in a beautiful lake in the Yosemite, and after they had grown tired they lay down in the sun upon a rock beside the lake. They soon fell fast asleep. How long they slept they did not know, but when they awoke they found that during their sleep the rock on which they lay had been stood on end, so that they were now nearly a mile high in the air and had no means of getting down. They were in a bad plight.

But the animals in the valley which were friendly to mountaineers saw their misfortune and held a conference as to how to help the boys get down. They decided that the only thing to do was to try to climb up the face of the cliff. But the rock, was too steep, and so they tried to jump up. First the raccoon tried it, then the bear, then the squirrel, then the fox, and finally the mountain-goat. It was all to no avail, however, and they gave up in discouragement, and were about to leave the boys to perish, when the inch-worm came along and offered her services. The animals laughed her to scorn. What could she do, with her snail-pace, when they all, who were so fleet of foot, had to give it up!

But she would not be laughed out of her purpose, and she began to climb up the cliff. Slowly, inch by inch, she crawled up, so slowly that it seemed as if she would take a thousand years to get there. But as she passed crag after crag the animals below ceased making fun of her and began to shout encouragement. At last she reached the top. And then the Great Spirit turned her into a huge butterfly so strong that she flew down, with the boys on her back, to safety.

There is a verse in the Old Testament which says that the race is not always to the swift, which means that it is not always the strongest who win. It is the one who keeps at it. Many a bright boy fails in school because the lessons come so easily he does not work. Many a dull boy wins because he sticks to it and plods away.

If you are tempted to trust too much to your brightness, remember the animals who made fun of the inch-worm. If you are dull, remember the inch-worm, take courage, and plod away. You will get there sometime.

 

Howard J. Chidley’s short story: Inch-Worm And The Mountain

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live life inch by inch and moment by moment

(~_~)

HISTORY OF BONSAI

The history of bonsai (pronounced bon-sigh) is cloaked in the mist of the past but it is now widely accepted that it was the Chinese who first created the miniature landscapes and trees that we now know as bonsai. In Japanese, bonsai can be literally translated as “tray planting”, but since originating in Asia so many centuries ago – it has developed into a whole new form. Called penjing by the Chinese, bonsai was believed to have had its start in the Han Dynasty. In this essay I will discuss some of the legends and facts surrounding the beginning of bonsai.

One of the earliest Chinese legends contends that it was in the Han Dynasty (206 B.C. – 220 A.D.) that an emperor created a landscape in his courtyard complete with hills, valleys, rivers, lakes and trees that represented his entire empire. He created the landscape so that he could gaze upon his entire empire from his palace window. This landscape form of art was also his alone to posess. It was said that anyone else found in possession of even a miniature landscape was seen as a threat to his empire and put to death.

Another Chinese legend relating to the beginnings of bonsai points to a fourth century A.D. Chinese poet and civil servant named Guen-ming. It’s believed that after his retirement he began growing chrysanthemums in pots. Some historians believe this was a step towards the beginning of bonsai in the Tang dynasty some 200 years later.

The earliest documented proof of bonsai was discovered in 1972 in the tomb of Prince Zhang Huai, of the Tang Dynasty (618 – 907 A.D.) who died in 706 A.D. Two wall paintings discovered in the tomb show servants carrying plants resemblingbonsai. In one of the paintings a servant is seen carrying a miniature landscape and in the other painting a servant is shown carrying a pot containing a tree.

Even though it’s the Japanese who get most of the credit for bonsai, it wasn’t until the Heian period (794 – 1191A.D.) that Buddhist monks brought bonsai to the island. For many years following the arrival of bonsai, the art was practiced by only the wealthy and thus came to be known as a nobleman privilege. The fact that the art of bonsai was limited to the noble class almost caused the art to die out in Japan. It was with the Chinese invasion of Japan in the fourteenth century that the art of bonsai started to be practiced by people of all classes. Once the art was practiced by all classes, bonsai began to grow in popularity in Japan. The Chinese influence on the early bonsai masters is apparent since the Japanese still use the same characters to represent bonsai as the Chinese. After the establishment of bonsai in Japan, the Japanese went to great lengths to refine the art and a lot of credit must go to these early bonsai masters. The refinements that they developed has made bonsai what it is today.

The earliest bonsai to come to the west came mostly from Japan and China. The showing of bonsai at the Third Universal Exhibition in Paris in 1878 and later exhibitions in 1889 and 1900 increased western interest in bonsai and opened the door for the first major bonsai exhibit held in London in 1909. In these early years many westerners felt that the trees looked tortured and many openly voiced their displeasure in the way the trees were being treated by bonsai masters. It wasn’t until 1935 that opinions changed and bonsai was finally classified as an art in the west.

With the end of World War II, bonsai started to gain in popularity in the west. It was the soldiers returning from Japan with bonsai in tow that sparked western interest in the art, even though most of the trees brought home by these soldiers died a short time after their arrival. They survived long enough to create a desire in westerners to learn more about the proper care of their bonsai. The large Japanese-American population was invaluable to Americans in this respect. Their knowledge of the art of bonsai was of great interest ot many Americans learning the art.

Today, bonsai are sold in department stores, garden centers, nurseries, and many other places. However, most of these are young cuttings or starts and not the true bonsai produced by bonsai masters. Most trees purchased today are known as pre-bonsai and are for the most part only used as a starting point. To create a true bonsai work of art you need to learn as much as possible about the art and the trees you use. Information is your key to success and it is important to read as much as possible. It is also a good idea to join a local bonsai club so you are able to discuss the subject with experienced bonsai enthusiasts. As your knowledge and confidence grow, creating your own bonsai works of art will become easier and your enjoyment of bonsai will grow.

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bonsai of thorns

by Art~

the midget cactus stood there
next to the train tracks
under blistered sun
drowning in the drought
shriveled up like raisins
as if waiting for a ride

she just turned, and was eight
set to save it’s life
to be the hero
with pink sparkling dress
taking stellar cellular photos
barking demands was her super power

I, the parent
plucked and planted the cactus
according to her whimpers
in an elephant ear pot
spreading multi-colored pebbles like frosting
adding faucet rain drops

magnify glass, tweezers and lamp
surgically removing miniature thorns
from callused grown up fingers
measuring no regrets
in exchange for adolescent smiles
pondering lessons learned

passing by, a green fly swatter
in hand makes a Jedi’s sword
daring to save the planet
killing flies one smack at a time
running into the black cat
passing by, a bonsai of thorns

 

we hold the world in our hands

(~_~)

The Dew Drop 

Peter Hughes

As the sun rose, a dew drop became aware of its surroundings. There it sat on a leaf, catching the sunlight and throwing it back out. Proud of its simple beauty, it was very content. Around it were other dew drops, some on the same leaf and some on other leaves round about. The dew drop was sure that it was the best, the most special dew drop of them all.

Ah, it was good to be a dew drop.

The wind rose and the plant began to shake, tipping the leaf. Terror gripped the dew drop as gravity pulled it towards the edge of the leaf, towards the unknown. Why? Why was this happening? Things were comfortable. Things were safe. Why did they have to change? Why? Why?

The dew drop reached the edge of the leaf. It was terrified, certain that it would be smashed into a thousand pieces below, sure that this was the end. The day had only just begun and the end had come so quickly. It seemed so unfair. It seemed so meaningless. It tried desperately to do whatever it could to cling to the leaf, but it was no use.

Finally, it let go, surrendering to the pull of gravity. Down, down it fell. Below there seemed to be a mirror. A reflection of itself seemed to be coming up to meet the dew drop. Closer and closer they came together until finally…

And then the fear transformed into deep joy as the tiny dew drop merged with the vastness that was the pond. Now the dew drop was no more, but it was not destroyed.

It had become one with the whole.

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Be at peace with yourself and you will be one with the whole

(~_~)

One day, a spider and a silkworm crossed paths and struck up a conversation. The spider said to the silkworm,

“I admit your silk is better than the silk from the spider. It is yellow and white, dazzling and bright. You use the silk that you spin yourself to make a beautiful comfortable cocoon, which you live inside thinking falsely you are kings. You dream in your little cocoon until the women put you in scalding hot water and peel your silk off strand by strand. Then your beautiful cocoons are all gone. What a shame, though you have the ability to create such beauty, then die because of it, is this not stupid?”

The silk worm thinking about what the spider said, answered:

“Our actions are actually like suicide, but we spin silk so that people can weave beautiful fabrics, giving all the people the ability to look beautiful. Can you really say our labor is a waste?

Look at you spider, your whole reason for weaving is to make a trap that will let you eat the little bugs that fly into it. You may not regret it, but don’t you at least think that is a little cruel?”

Bowing his head, the spider left.

With his words, the silkworm reminded the spider that in the end, humanity makes wondrous things out of his thread, while the spider is killed and his webs are brushed away with a broom.

Moral: On one hand, many people think it is a waste to do things that do not personally benefit them. These people cannot understand why making sacrifices for the benefit of others would be either logical or acceptable. On the other hand, there are some people who are satisfied knowing that their sacrifices benefit others. They have learned the joy of service to others.

When we learn to look up from our small needs, leave our egos behind and look at the broader picture and needs of humanity, we have taken a significant step on the path to enlightenment.

(note: You see it all the time, online and on the streets, “webs” of deceit made to trap you for the gain of the all mighty dollar. There are a lot more spiders than there are silk worms, yet there are still a great number of silk worms that sacrifice themselves for others, which are you?)

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re-posting

 

Once upon a time there was a serpent that was persecuting a firefly. The poor firefly fled from the ferocious predator, using all the energy created by fear to speed him along.

The serpent, however, never considered giving up his pursuit, so he chased the poor firefly run away one day, and again for the second day.

The ordeal continued, until the third day.

Without the strength to continue, the firefly stopped and asked the Serpent, “May I ask you three questions?”

The Serpent said with a haughty tone, “I’m not used to answering anyone, but since I am going to devour you, you can ask me anything”.

“Am I part of your food chain?”

“No” answered the Serpent

“Did I hurt you or provoke you in any way?” asked the firefly.

“No” repeated the serpent.

“So, why do you want to devour me?”

“Well”, said the Serpent, “because I can’t stand to see your shining light.”

In your life, there will always be “serpents” that will come about to try to steal your light and dreams; you will have two options:

You can stop shinning your light, so no serpent will be after you any longer, or you can let your light shine even brighter and learn how to deal with people like that. But it will always be your choice.

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Sources:

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Did you know~ Outdoors, spider’s make their webs facing south. (South of the equator they make them facing north… always toward the sun)

 

~In the spider web of facts many truths are strangled~

(~_~)

This story was written by Brio Keegan ~Oct 2011 (re-blogged)

In a wealthy land, a sage opened up a school on top of a desolate hill to teach the people a better way of living. The people in that land thought that his lessons will make them even wealthier, so a lot of people tried to get into the school. Despite the large volume of applicants, the school only had a handful of students because the sage wanted to test each aspiring student and see if he or she was ready. As such, getting into the school became a status symbol for the inhabitants of that land.

One day, the only son of the richest family came up to the sage’s school since he was also aspiring for a better life for himself and to boost his family’s reputation. After climbing up the thousand steps, he arrived at the gate of the school, and yelled at the top of his lungs, “Oh great sage, give me an opportunity to study at your school!”

His plea was heard, and soon, the gate opened to reveal the smiling sage followed by a servant who was carrying a jar. Then, the sage said, “Come and walk with me.”

The rich, young man and the servant followed the sage as he wandered all over the hill. The sage gave odd commands like “look up,” “look down,” “squint your eyes,” and “peep through your fingers.” They did these pointless things as they walked. When they reached a stone jutting out from the hill’s face, he said, “That’s your first lesson, and now, I’ll check if you’ve learned. This is an opportunity,” while pointing at a green shoot growing from the stone. “What is this?” the sage asked.

While waiting for his answer, the sage instructed the servant to fetch water further down the hill.

“It’s a plant growing on a rock, Teacher,” said the beaming young man.

The sage turned his back and said, “Try to look again, and come back tomorrow. Tell me the right answer.”

The young man was crushed to hear that he was wrong, but he was determined. He ran back to his father’s extensive collection of books about plants to identify what was growing on the rock. Then, he went back to the sage.

“It’s a Notholaena sulphurea, the fern that’s growing on the rock!” he exclaimed, but the sage gave the same answer, “Please look at it again. Come back tomorrow and tell me the right answer.”

Thinking that he’s closer to the right answer, he went back to his father’s library to identify the rock that’s jutting from the hill. Again, he went back to the sage.

“The Notholaena sulphurea is growing on a rock made out of gypsum,” he said proudly.

The sage smiled, and said, “Look more closely. Then, come back tomorrow and tell me the right answer.”

This time, he felt frustrated. He threw a temper tantrum because he was still wrong. While he was stomping around, the servant of the sage saw him. Curious to know what he was doing sobbing in the middle of the arid hill, the servant asked, “Why are you crying?”

“I can’t get this stupid test right,” said the young man in an exasperated tone.

“If you think this test is stupid, you might be spitting up in the air. Soon, that spit will land on you,” replied the servant.

“What are you saying – that I’m the stupid one?” the young man growled angrily.

“No,” the servant said. “Do you want to know the answer?”

“Well, of course I do!” the young man snapped.

“What did Teacher say to you when he pointed at the plant?” asked the servant.

Mockingly imitating the sage, the frustrated young man said, “This is an opportunity.”

“Exactly!” smiled the servant.

With a puzzled expression, the young man said, “I don’t get it.”

“Do you want to know the answer?” the servant repeated his question.

“Why do you keep on asking that? You didn’t tell me the first time, so why should I even answer your question? Why are you even talking to me? You’re just a servant!”

“I can see that you won’t get it at all, so being a humble servant, I’ll ignore your rude remark and help you with the answer,” the servant said. Before the young man could protest, the servant pointed at the plant again and started talking, “According to Teacher, everything is opportunity, and if you don’t see life like that, you’d need to change vantage points. More than the scientific name of the plant or the type of stone that it is growing on, which is the obvious way of looking at this test, you needed to look at the plant and the rock differently to see that it’s a metaphor for opportunity. The plant doesn’t have any other place to grow on, so it took the chance to grow in the crack and make the most of it. Look at it now. It already has a second leaf growing. It didn’t give up, much like Teacher. Each day, he took the opportunity to make you change your vantage point and asked you to come back. He didn’t say you failed, did he? He gave you all the clues, but you ignored all the opportunities that he gave you, so now, I’m off to tell him that you gave up. Even now, you have the opportunity to learn, yet you still refuse since the explanation is coming from a servant.”

Off the servant went and the young man was left downtrodden. He went home to his father’s house to tell him of the bad news, but the servant’s words echoed in his head. Everything is opportunity, and if you don’t see life like that, you’d need to change vantage points. Then, he realized something. When he went to see his father, instead of announcing the bad news, he said, “Today, the Teacher taught me to see everything in life as an opportunity. Because I’ve learned that lesson, I was also able to learn a lesson on humility.” With that one lesson, the young man learned a better way of living, which he practiced until the day he died.

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may opportunity knock on your door every day

(~_~)

 

An owl and a Seagull went into business together. The owl did not have any money so he borrowed some. The seagull owned a precious jewel and he put that into the venture as well.

The two of them went to board a ship, having decided to start their business in a far off land. But there was a storm and the ship sank. The owl and the seagull managed to get to safety.

But they lost all of their possessions. Ever since then, the owl only comes out at night for fear of meeting its creditors and the seagull flies high over the rocks in the hope that the sea will give him back his precious jewel.

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      Once lived a turkey, he was very curious and always causing mischief, because of this, his name was Trouble. One day he asked another fellow turkey why turkeys don’t fly but other birds do. To this the fellow turkey answered: “I do not know. It sure would make escaping from the butcher at Thanksgiving a lot easier, but not flying is the turkeys’ tradition, so I shall not fly.”
          Of course Trouble thought that was a silly reason not to fly. So he went to ask his Mother. “Mother,” Trouble said “Why don’t us turkeys fly?” His mother smiled and answered back, “I do not know, but just thinking about it makes my back ache! Besides not flying is the turkeys’ tradition, so I shall not fly.”
          Still, Trouble was not satisfied. He waddled all the way to Utah, then asked his distant cousin, the Seagull, and said, “Mother, and a fellow turkey told me that turkeys don’t fly because it is their tradition, it might be theirs but it is surely not mine.” Seagull chuckled, “Trouble, Trouble, Trouble! You must not understand! Turkeys aren’t meant to fly. They are meant to be eaten on Thanksgiving dinner, if turkeys flew there’d be no turkey for Thanksgiving, but if you’re sure you want to fly, I’ll teach you. Trouble was very happy and thanked Seagull.
          They started lessons the next day, Seagull taught Trouble how to hold his wings just right and how to land with out having a horrible injury. When the time came that Trouble had learned all there was to learn, Seagull said, “Okay let’s go for a test-fly,”
Trouble agreed and they climbed to the tip-top of the Rocky Mountains. Seagull was the first to go; he jumped and dived gracefully, then flew back up to where Trouble was still standing. “Your turn” Seagull cried. Trouble swallowed hard; as if to try to keep back all of his fears. He nodded, then jumped he opened his wings, straightened his tail feathers, and . . . flew.
          “Ha-ha” Trouble laughed, “wait till’ my flock sees this!” He thanked Seagull one last time, flew to the ground, and waddled all the way back home. All the turkeys welcomed Trouble back home, but no matter how hard Trouble tried, he could never fly again.
          What’s the moral of the story? It fun to try different things, but family traditions last a life time.

may your day be filled with simplicity

(~_~)

Why Turtles have no ears  by Art~ 2012

Once upon a time, a long time ago, a turtle was making its way through the sea, swimming. It heard the sorrowful moans of the whales bellowing in the distance. The turtle said, “I can’t stand to hear the whales cry.” So, the turtle headed for the shore and crawled up on land.

There the turtle heard the seagulls fighting and squabbling. “Give me that fish,” “Get out of here,” “I hate you,” “Go away.” The seagulls yelled. The turtle hurried deeper into the woods to get away from the negative tones of the shore birds.

A great storm came, lightening and thundering crashed all around, frightening the turtle to the point that the turtle withdrew into its shell. “I wish I didn’t have ears to hear all this loud noise and all the bickering the animals do.” It was days before the turtle became hungry and had to venture out for something to eat. Drawn to water as turtles are, the turtle headed back to the sea.

When the turtle got back to the sea, it heard the roar of the ocean, the chattering of the gulls and once again wished it didn’t have ears to hear all that was bothersome to it.

Not far from where the turtle was there were two crabs fighting over a dead fish. The crabs pulled in a tug-of-war trying to dominate the morsel. Finally one crab reached out with its pincher and cut the fish in half. Seeing this the turtle had an idea. It went over to the crab and the crab started to dart away.

“Wait,” yelled the turtle. “I can give you more fish!” The crab stopped and went back toward the turtle. “I have a request and I am willing to give you more fish for a small favor.”

“What is the favor?” The crab asked.

“I couldn’t help but notice how sharp your pincher’s are,” The turtle began. “Do you think they are sharp enough to cut off my ears? I will pay you in fish if you do.”

Without hesitation the crab reached out and pinched off one of the turtles ears. “Ouch,” yelled the turtle.

“Bring me the fish and I will do the same to the other one.” The crab stated. The turtle went into the sea and captured a fish and brought it back to the crab. The crab inspected the fish and with-out a moments thought, pinched off the turtles other ear.

The turtle thanked the crab and went on its way. With-out any ears the turtle was momentarily satisfied till it once again heard the squabbling of the gulls. Realizing that even with-out ears the turtle could still hear. Just then the turtle heard the most wonderful sound, “Momma, Momma.” Little baby turtles came running to the turtle. The turtle embraced her young and delighted in their every sound, ear-less.

Growing up, the baby turtles all noticed that they had ears and their mother did not. Wanting to be like their mother, they too made a deal with the crabs. The crabs were happy to oblige for a meal and pinching off turtle ears was a fade for awhile, till all the turtles eventually, had no ears.

(moral: Body modifications are so common these days like: tattoos, tongue rings, lip and eye piercings, colored and spiked hair, it seems some may be trying to change their outer selves when deep down the inside is still the same. Trying to change ones-self begins on the inside. Then again, others are simply trying to fit in.)

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It’s no Godzilla, but an “earless rabbit allegedly born near Japan’s severely-damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant has become the latest poster child for the side-effects of radiation exposure.

The bunny — purportedly captured on video just outside the crippled plant exclusion area and posted on YouTube on May 21 — has become big news in Japan and, to a lesser extent, elsewhere, stoking fears that contamination from the damaged facility could cause genetic mutations.

But both rabbit experts and radiation researchers told AOL Weird News the bunny’s bizarre looks could have a less sensational explanation……   (more of this story: here)

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You have two ears and one mouth, use them proportionalley

(~_~)

Art~

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